Fight them on the breaches

Naturally, we are all worried about the potential for cyberattack by agents of foreign powers bent on destroying our way of life. Or Skynet, whichever comes first.

Kroes called on Europe’s 27 member states to develop the region’s first contingency plan for cyber attacks and form emergency response teams by end-2012. Regional and local attack exercises should become a matter of routine, and individual countries should help develop agreed global security principals for the Web and cloud computing.

[From Kroes calls for coordinated cyber security | Telecoms Europe]

When I read this, I the word “local” tripped me up, because I’m not sure what it means in this context, but then I thought of a kind of 21-st century home guard standing by to repel them on the e-beaches and wondered if this makes more sense given Europe’s demographics. Neelie Kroes specifically mentions Belgium in the article. In Belgium only half of the adult population work: the rest are unemployed or have retired on generous pensions, so the idea of a group of retired bank managers, policemen, local government officials and unemployed persons coming together to form the new Dad’s Cyber-Army (“who do you think you are kidding, Mr. Assange… tra la la”) made me start laughing. I’ve already got some ideas for the first few episodes, and have a classic punchline ready for action: “What’s your password?” / “Don’t tell him it’s ‘Pike'”.

In the future, everyone will be famous for fifteen megabytes… [posted with ecto]

New NFC rumours about the “internet of things”

[Dave Birch]

The rumours that Google and a number of other organisations have formed a study group to look at the idea of offering people free injectable NFC chips in return for special offers, coupons, additional loyalty points an a variety of value-added services around Android NFC phones are quite interesting. I imagine that the idea is to make Android more attractive than iPhone/iPad by making the owners part of the much-talked about “Internet of things”. This is hardly a new idea, but what is interesting is that the deployment is being proposed so soon.

Katrina Michael, associate professor of the University of Wollongong’s school of information systems and technology, and author of scientific paper Towards a State of Uberveillance, said subdermal chip implants in humans could be commonplace within two to three generations.

[From The Next Generation May be ‘Chipped’ – PCWorld]

Why would I want one of these? Well, for example, suppose that I take my URL “www.dgwbirch.com” and encode it in some way (you can see an example here) and add that to my chip, then anyone who taps me with a Google Nexus S loaded with the right software could read it and have it added to their bookmarks immediately. Some people might want to have their Facebook “Real Name” coded into the chip, but I think that for rather dull middle-aged businesspersons (such as myself) the LinkedIn profile would be better. Who knows – the point is that surveys have shown that whatever the Privacy International’s of the world might think, people like the idea:

“We just carried out a survey and one out of four people are happy to have a chip planted under their skin for very trivial uses for example to pass gates more quickly at a discotheque for example and to be able to pay for things more quickly in the supermarket,”

[From CeBIT: Quarter Of Germans Happy To Have Chip Implants | eWEEK Europe UK]

The advantages are obvious. You would never have to remember a wallet, an ID card, a bus pass, whatever, because it would be permanently embedded in you. It is not difficult to see why Google might want to implant chips in people, and it’s interesting to note that the rumours coincide with more stories about the imminent demise of QR codes.

But last December, Google started sending out window decals with NFC chips to participating businesses in Portland, Oregon. Earlier this week, Google officially dropped support for QR codes from the product.

[From Google: NFC Is Replacing QR Codes.]

Not everyone is as enthusiastic about the chipping as I am. I’m not an expert on the Book of Revelations, so I don’t understand the theological objection to tracking at 13.56GHz as opposed to optical wavelengths, but it should be noted that there are people who are against this idea.

One group believes that the chips are a mark of the beast and are against implants. In biblical prophecy, this is a number written on the forehead, to mark those controlled by an evil power.

[From RFID Gazette: 16 Barriers to RFID Ubiquity]

Well there will always be luddites like these around, but let’s be sensible about this. None of the rumours* have suggested that Goggle will insist on having the chips implanted in the forehead: when I was looking at this issue a while back, I was imagining that fleshier areas would be more appropriate. Anyway, I’m curious why people would be so upset about this very practical use of NFC to solve a wide range of social problems.

Yes, use these chips to track dogs and animals but not human beings. This method has not only been suggested for use against white slavery and child theft, but also for many other uses.

[From Should chip-implant tracking be used to stop white slavery and child theft? – by Esther Stafford – Helium]

All in all, I think that this is a really interesting use of NFC and I fully expect to see it supported in the iPhone 5 [how wrong can you be!! — Ed.].

In the future, everyone will be famous for fifteen megabytes

Bost Office?

[Dave Birch] I hate the stupid “captcha” codes that some web sites use to determine whether you are person or a spam bot when logging in to a web site. Earlier todsy I had to create yet another Windows Live ID because I’d forgotten what my old one was. Why Windows Live can’t use OpenID I don’t know, but instead it forces you to mess about entering the same old data over again. Stupid. What’s more, because I couldn’t figure out what the captcha code actually was, I took me four attempts to finally log in correctly. I mean what on Earth does this say???

Screen shot 2011-01-23 at 09.14.20

This provides no security at all, of course, because the spammers already have software that can read captcha codes better than I can, so what’s the point? Surely it would be easier for Windows to accept OpenID log ins from sites that have already made people jump through hoops to prove that they are actually people.

In the future, everyone will be famous for fifteen megabytes

You’ve got fail

[Dave Birch] Yes, I know you’re not supposed to substitute anecdotes about your kids for real research, knowledge and insight into the future of society, but I’ve been reflecting on an exchange with my own Generation W (as in W for “whatever”) earlier in the day, and thought it was something worth sharing. It’s a small window into the near-term future of online communications.

My eldest son was walking into Waitrose with me when he took out his iPhone and said “Wow! amazing – Andy wasn’t lying! – He sent me some iPhone wallpaper he designed”. I thought his slur on Andy’s design skills was harsh, and told him so. “No,” he said, “I mean that he said he was going to e-mail them to me, and I thought he was just saying that, because no-one uses e-mail.”

In the future, everyone will be famous for fifteen megabytes

11″

[Dave Birch] Well, I’ve got to say that I absolutely lurve my new MacBook Air. I got the small one, the 11-incher, and I just bought the entry level version with 2Gb RAM and 64Gb Flash. The MacBook Pro will remain my main machine, but it will only travel from my desk at home to my desk at the office. The rest of the time I’ll be carrying around a Kg of Air instead of 3Kg of Pro.

It’s an absolute joy to use. It’s a full-sized keyboard, which I need, in a not-much-more than keyboard-size package. The screen is bright and clear. If 1366×768 sounds small to you, well it isn’t. I’ve been writing blog posts, editing documents and even working on presentations on it, all with no problem at all.

In the future, everyone will be famous for fifteen megabytes

Let’s ask BT where the next Skype is coming from

[Dave Birch] Some years ago, I wandered into work one morning to find the client I was working for absolutely furious. The client was an American, and he was reading about a presidential “power breakfast” or some such. It was to bring business leaders together with the White House to do something about unemployment, as I recall. My client pointed out that the people invited to the breakfast (the usual suspects: General Motors, Citi etc) employed a small number of people, in subsectors that had very special drivers, and that the single largest employer in the US at the time was Manpower, who were not at the breakfast. But, as he pointed out, since almost all employment in the US in small businesses and that (I can’t remember the exact statistic, but it was something like) 90% of all new jobs were being created in companies that employed less than 20 people, the President should have thrown out GM and Citi and invited in a few small businesses instead: a shopkeeper, someone starting a new company in his basement, a VC-funded started with less than 20 people, and so on.

Government is big, and backward looking, so it finds itself most comfortable dealing with big companies that have been successful in the recent past. As far as I can tell, this provides absolutely no help at all looking forward. If Google didn’t invent Facebook, how will talking to the government about it help to see what’s next? And Microsoft didn’t invent Google, and BT didn’t invent Skype, and Electronic Arts didn’t invent Zynga, and so it goes.

In the future, everyone will be famous for fifteen megabytes