Working (?) lunch

A couple of years ago I was interviewed on the BBC television programme “Working Lunch”, shortly after which it was taken of the air and is sadly now only a memory. It happened to be on a day in the school holidays and I was taking my sons into London to go to a movie or something, so I brought them along with me. The BBC were very kind hosts and let the boys come and see the gallery while I was being interviewed. This was quite exciting for them so they shot some video with their phones. Later on, I thought it would be funny to put the “making of” documentary up with the interview on our family YouTube channel (which is password-protected and only viewed by family members). I hadn’t looked at it for ages, but I was showing to a family friend the other day and I noticed that the soundtrack cut out. Why? Well, there’s a weird comment appeared with the video that says something about copyright!

Those BBC bastards! I’m a licence payer, and if I want to include a clip from an old episode of Working Lunch on my private YouTube channel because I WAS BEING INTERVIEWED then I should be allowed to it.

 

In the future, everyone will be famous for fifteen megabytes

Liberal interpretations

I once read a fascinating article in Prospect magazine about an experiment to explore moral dilemmas. The thought experiment rests on notions of railways, tracks and switches: essentially, people are asked to make choices about life and death. In one experiment, you can set the switch to send an out-of-control train down one branch, where it will kill five people, or down another branch, where it will kill one person. That sort of thing, in all sorts of different configurations.

I thought the most surprising result of the experiment was the difference between liberals and conservatives. In an experiment where subjects could save a Philharmonic orchestra by pushing an African American on to the tracks or could save the Harlem Jazz Orchestra by pushing a WASP on to the tracks, the liberals showed a marked propensity to make different choices, whereas conservatives did not. This suggests to me, at least, that there is a deep-seated difference between the world views, more than simply political attitudes.

 

In the future, everyone will be famous for fifteen megabytes

Mobile data paradox

My chum Tony Poulos interviewed an analyst from Ovum about mobile data pricing recently. I was listening to this, and it reminded me about a huge telecommunications conference that I attended a couple of months ago. There were hundreds of people and operators from all around the world. At one point during the event, the wifi went down. At this point, not only did people stop blogging, twittering and otherwise recording what was going on but actually stopped looking at and listening to the speaker. Basically, at an event full of people from telcos, no-one had data roaming turned on.

The mobile operators have priced mobile data roaming so insanely that they are encouraging their customers and their own employees to seek alternatives. Instead of making a reasonable amount of money from them, they make none, and are actively training the customers to reduce future revenues. I don’t need my e-mail every second – it’s not like I’m a heart surgeon waiting to hear about a transplant – and people can text me if there’s anything urgent. So I leave roaming turned off and wait until I walk part Starbucks or wherever.

If they keep this up, they may be able to persuade to turn off mobile data completely.

 

In the future, everyone will be famous for fifteen megabytes